A phrase a week (12)

Hello and welcome back to A phrase a week … after a long break. This week’s phrase is do your best, which is probably known to most of you. But did you know that try your best is also possible? While they mean the same thing, the first one is the more common in spoken English. Here are two examples: I don’t know if I can finish the report by tomorrow but I’ll do my best. | „You speak very good English.” „Thank you. I try my best.”

Best is the superlative of good. The comparative is better. „Gooder” and „goodest” do not exist. It’s definitely the best-known irregular adjective alongside bad-worse-worst and far-further-furthest.

And now for a motivational quote, a funny little rhyme – first coined by St. Jerome it seems – that applies to learning foreign languages: „Good, better, best … never let it rest, until your good is better and your better is best.”